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Audit of Police Reports
A police forensic report is one of the most important tools that the prosecution has against your client.

The court will accept a police report as it is, unless there is evidence to dispute its validity. This dispute can be either by producing counter evidence, or by questioning the accuracy, integrity and validity of the evidence in the police report itself.

Strathclyde Forensics provides  you with the know how and all the expertise you need, in order to scrutinize every police forensic report.

It is our job to look for mistakes, omissions or any kind of technical errors that may compromise the presentation of the evidence in that report, and that may be used to the benefit of your client.

The discrediting of a police report may be the one single event that can determine if your client is found guilty or not guilty.

In one of our very first cases we found evidence to discredit a police report on a mobile phone. We found not less than four instances of the evidence being compromised.
"Ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat". This Latin expression is one of the corner stones of most legal systems. It roughly translates as "the burden of proof is with who accuses, not on he who denies.

This is the premise on which our legal systems work in the UK. And based on this, the prosecution has always the burden of proof. That is the Crown Prosecutor or the Procurator Fiscal (in Scotland).

In most criminal cases, the prosecution relies on police reports. These can be incident reports and often forensic reports.