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Electronic Documents Forensics
Electronic documents come in all forms and formats, and they are part of virtually every business or legal transaction.  They may be original documents created with office suites and applications like Word and Excel. They may be pdf or other formats converted from another original source, or they can be reverse engineered from a later format back to their original. They can be saved, emailed, backuped.

All electronic documents store a minimum amount of information about them. We call that "metadata", and that is described as "data about the data". The least amount of metadata include when a document was created, when it was last accessed and when it was last altered.

However, depending on the settings of the software that created a particular document, there may be a lot of additional information, like the number and content of revisions, when a document was printed and by which printer, what was the version of the original software that created it, the name of the computer and the user that created and accessed it.
We have vast experience in analyzing electronic documents of virtually any kind, and provide the maximum amount of information that is embeded in these documents. The majority of such work comes from business cases and Employment Tribunal cases.

Contact us now and find out how we can help.